The Spout

Restaurant

The Spout

Land lying between the Inner Harbour and the Lagoon, approximately four acres; an extension of the Botanical Gardens. Planted with trees and shrubs of medical, economic and scenic value tamarind, pomegranate, cassia fistula, flamboyant, alata and spectabalis etc. all watered by rain and springs created from its once-live volcano.

On one side of this point lay the Lagoon and mangrove swamp, the other boasted a snow white beach with stone diving jetty and a wooden, red painted bath house up kept by the Agricultural Department. Amazingly, some ingenious person had trapped fresh water from a nearby spring which was used for rinsing salt from bathers.

The name “The Spout” was derived from volcanic emissions and the resultant carbonic springs. In the early thirties a spring located on the yacht club’s walkway still spouted. This was capped and enclosed in a concrete grave.

  • -

The Spout was a beautiful spot where within touching distance one could watch schooners and sloops careened for repair. Fanned by the breeze, nurses with their charges strolled in the afternoon sun, and, lovers made use of the night’s moon, despite the fact that this location was the favorite haunt of the ligaroo.

The volcanic crater, from whose height children enjoyed a palmist ski slide, was leveled by the Royal Engineers at the outset of World War II. Headquarters and camp were erected to house and administer to His Majesty’s Infantry force stationed in Grenada.

  • -

Nearer the Gardens’ gate, a boat used for transporting the Agricultural Superintendent to and from the Colonial Secretary’s Office could be seen upheld by davits when not in use. This boat was oared by a uniformed sailor of the Water Police Division.

The Watchman’s quarters of slave-era architecture, partly destroyed by age and storm, later had its stone ruins flattened. The Grenada Yacht Club stands in this site.

Relaxation

Quality

Dedicated Team

Grenada Yacht Club

The Spout

The Watchman’s quarters of slave-era architecture, partly destroyed by age and storm, later had its stone ruins flattened. The Grenada Yacht Club stands in this site.

At the war’s end the buildings were handed over and occupied by the Grenada Boys Secondary School with accommodations for Headmaster, two masters, Boarding School, and Matron. Today, the Spout hosts many educational institutions and the Grenada Yacht Club.

August 2013
Nellie Payne

CGC03914
CGC03793
CGC03749